Nakwon Korean Restaurant: Food | Fried Chicken

Nakwon Korean Restaurant: Food | Fried Chicken

NakWon House was the first stop for many tourists and inhabitants of Korean towns who had never had Korean food before. Vermont Avenue and Olympic Boulevard crossed by the famed 24-hour eatery for 34 years. As a result of the financial difficulties caused by the epidemic, Nak Won has decided to close its doors indefinitely.

One of Korea’s most popular restaurants, NakWon, was famed for its all-day menu of Korean classics like bibimbap, suhllungtang, and bulgogi. A Korean bunsik, or low-cost restaurant providing snacks and comfort food, was defined by its modest, well-lit interior and practical decor.

The eatery was likened to Denny’s, a family-friendly eatery that supplied reasonable food at all hours of the day to the Koreans. In the morning, early risers and late-night revelers alike found this to be a convenient way to eat a hearty bowl of soup. Korea town’s most equitable restaurant, Nak Won, was located in Korea town. In 1991, Hodori opened next door with a 24-hour structure and a vast menu of Korean food staples, causing a bit of a rivalry between the two restaurants.

The menu at Nak Won:

It’s a good idea to order something from each of the main categories at NakWon Garden, as the menu is rather extensive. In addition to the usual suspects like Korean fried chicken wings and pig bulgogi, there was kimchi cajun and dukbokki.

The mandoo and kimchi pajun, for example, are available in small and large portions. From what we could tell, the larger portions were more than enough to feed a small family. However, there is only one size available for the entrees is large. The pig bulgogi was served with rice, lettuce wraps, and a smattering of banchan sides, all of which were virtually platter-sized. We only needed one of the entrees, and we had plenty of leftovers. However, because they are only available in one size and are somewhat expensive, we decided to get more appetizers to round out our meal rather than two entrees.

Food of NakWon:

They were all excellent examples of their respective genres. Ddukbokki was mildly spicy with a tomato-based sauce that complemented the chewy rice cakes and vegetables in the Manu. The huge kimchi pajun was thicker than typical but didn’t overshadow the kimchi.

NakWon Fried Chicken:

A Korean restaurant’s fried chicken is always an intriguing choice. Because it may be prepared in a variety of ways, from simply with a dry rub to including a variety of sauces. Spicy Korean wings drenched in a sweet and sour gochugaru sauce that increased in temperature as it cooked. The skin was crisp and a wonderful contrast to the softness that resulted from the 20-minute journey home.

As far as we’re concerned, Korean fried chicken ticks all the right boxes.

Spicy Pork Bulgogi:

An excellent version of spicy pork bulgogi was served. We liked how spicy it was, how tangy the sauce was, and how much meat was in it. If you’re offered a main dish that includes lettuce, rice, and a side of banchan and soybean paste, you can form mini lettuce wraps and experiment with different flavors combinations in every bite.

This was a great touch that brought back memories of eating at Korean barbeque restaurants.

Other Dishes:

NakWon also serves various traditional Korean dishes. Among the favorites were herb and duenjang samgyupsal, yangnyumgalbi, sundubu jogye, Gyeran Jjim (steamed egg). Also, a wide variety of limitless options, included sticky steamed rice, pickled cloves of garlic, radish, sweet marble potatoes, and, of course, kimchi.

Nak-Won is the only restaurant to employ large portions of premium pork instead of paper-thin slices. Unli-samgyup is like a buffet, except it’s a lot more delicious.

As exciting as cooking your own meals can be, it’s also good to have some food prepared in the kitchen. To conclude their  Korean lunch, they ordered Jjampong (hot seafood noodles). Which is likely to excite spicy food fans, as well as a bowl of Kimchi. Jjamppong at NakWon is the best, with a pot full of mussels, squid, and vegetables in red hot broth. However, be aware! It’s a good idea to have some soju on hand in case you get a little spicy.

Final Verdict:

NakWon House, Koreatown’s most equitable restaurant, was located in Korea town. The eatery was likened to Denny’s, a family-friendly eatery that supplied reasonable food at all hours of the day to the Koreans. In 1991, Hodori opened next door with a 24-hour structure and a vast menu of Korean food staples. Nak-Won’s Unli-samgyup is like a buffet, except it’s a lot more delicious. Jjamppong is the best I’ve ever had, with a pot full of mussels, squid, and vegetables in red hot broth. It’s a good idea to have some soju on hand in case you get a little spicy.

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